People in California who follow reality TV star Amanda Stanton may be interested to learn about recent changes in her child support agreement with her ex-husband Nick Buonfiglio. The couple had two daughters together before their split in 2015.

Amid accusations that he cheated on Stanton and neglected his daughters, Buonfiglio began asking for reduced child support payments and more time with the children. He disapproved of Stanton’s decision to allow the girls to be in the public eye and said his $2,000 support payments should be reduced since he was struggling financially while Stanton was making more money. A court agreed and reduced his monthly payment to 530 dollars.

Court documents when the two were first divorced listed Buonfoglio’s income as $100 annually. According to documents related to the change in child support, she now makes $13,000 per month. Murray, her current partner, makes $10,000 per month.

As this case demonstrates, the situation that child support payments are based on can change over time, and this can lead to changes in child support obligations as well. Buonfiglio made the right choice in going through the court system to get his payments changed. Regardless of what has caused the change in material circumstances that make it difficult for a person to meet their child support obligations, a delay may result in a person still owing the same amount, plus interest if unpaid, until a court approves a modification. Other major changes to child custody and support agreements, such as one parent moving out of state, should also go through the court system.